Tuesday, October 27, 2009

I haven't told many people that I'm an atheist now. It makes me a little sad, because I always really wanted to be the good kind of Catholic, the one whose faith is important to them and gives them solace in times of need, but who can religiously rationalize the acceptance of other religions without need for conversion and who can incorporate God into the theory of evolution and quantum mechanics and all that... but I've come to realize that just because I wanted to be that sort of perfect, intelligent, principled Catholic didn't mean I ever actually believed in God. I know now that I never really did.

I can't tell if I'm more ashamed of remaining Catholic for so long despite an obvious disbelief in God, or of robbing the Church of one more possible good ambassador.


Anonymous
10/27/2009
01:13:00 AM

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is a bit like the way I felt when I realized that, as much as I liked my church, I wasn't really "Christian" any more.

Anonymous said...

The story ain't over yet.

Anonymous said...

I think it's silly to renounce your religion just because the concept of God seems implausible. I've always held on to the idea that something doesn't have to exist for me to believe in it.

Dr. A said...

Anon3, you simply cannot mean that.

By your logic, what's to stop you from believing in fairy dust and wishes?

Anonymous said...

Nothing, but I don't. If I'd grown up with the belief and enjoyed it then I probably would.

Anonymous said...

:) Good for you, Anon 3. I would love to 'believe' in fairy dust and wishes. I'm jealous.

PChis said...

God can easily be incorporated into the theory of evolution and quantum mechanics, and God isn't an implausible idea all.

There is no empirical proof for or against the existence of any specific sort of deity.


I don't think the OP should be ashamed of remaining part of the catholic church. There is a lot more to religion and the society surrounding it than just faith and dogma. Whether you go to see friends, to be apart of a group, or to listen to the music, they are all valid reasons for going to church.

Faith isn't something anyone can force. It's supposed to be a feeling deep inside that something is true without any evidence of it. I'm sure many of the worshipers in the US do not have a concrete faith.

I would say if you like going to church then go. If you don't like going then don't. Don't be ashamed of what you can't change.


Also: There's a lot of good stuff written by various popes and higher ups in the catholic church on evolution and religion as well as other philosophical obstacles if you look around.

Anonymous said...

I stopped believing in a higher power a long time ago. I think we are responsible for our own actions and we should come to terms with each other as humans. We don't have to believe in a higher power to have compassion and a feeling of togetherness. It's ridiculous when people go to church to feel 'connected' because it can be done without a church.

Anonymous said...

That's dumb, Anon8. It's not necessary to do something another way just because it can be done that way. What you've got works for you, and that's awesome, but others find a different way to get that feeling. What is ridiculous about that?

anon8 said...

I meant ridiculous that many people believe that's the only place they can feel accepted. It just makes me sad because it seems thats the only reason to feel accepted is because you're in a church. I never go to church, but I'm a good person yet my church friends ridicule me for not going to church, thus I'm 'not accepted'.